Tag Archives: Sockeye Fire

Alaska wildland fires from 2015 still pose risks this year

A year after the second-largest fire season on record in Alaska, the 2015 fire season is still smoking. The Alaska Division of Forestry has detected 16 “holdover” fires so far this season, including one on Saturday that ignited the 8,130-acre Medfra Fire now burning in a remote part of Southwest Alaska. Holdover fires are just […]

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Sockeye Fire investigation complete, charges filed

Two Anchorage residents are facing multiple charges in relation to the start of the Sockeye Fire north of Willow last month that destroyed 55 homes and damaged 44 other structures. Following an investigation by the Alaska Division of Forestry and Alaska State Fire Marshal’s Office, charges were filed in Palmer District Court on Monday against […]

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Sockeye Fire update, July 10

Update: July 10, 2015 Fire Information: George Coyle Division of Forestry (907) 761-6233 (907) 982-0049 Fire Status Acres Burned: 7220 Cause: Human – Under investigation Structures Destroyed – 55 Restrictions: The suspension on Burn Permits in Mat-Su Area was lifted on 7-8-15. Burn Bans in the Mat-Su Boro, City of Houston and Municipality of Anchorage […]

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Sockeye Fire update, July 6

Fire Information: George Coyle Division of Forestry (907) 761-6233 (907) 982-0049 Fire Status Acres Burned: 7220 Cause: Human – Under investigation Structures Destroyed – 55 Closures: Burn Permits in Mat-Su Area are suspended. Open fires banned on Mat-Su Borough Lands. A burn ban/closure is in effect for the Municipality of Anchorage Resources Incident Commander: Kevin […]

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Sockeye Fire update, July 5

Sockeye Fire Update: July 5, 2015 Fire Information: George Coyle Division of Forestry (907) 761-6233 (907) 982-0049 Incident Commander: Kevin Menkens Alaska Division of Forestry Fire Status Acres Burned: 7220 Cause: Human – Under investigation Structures Destroyed:  55 Closures: Burn Permits in Mat-Su Area are suspended. Open fires banned on Mat-Su Borough Lands. . A […]

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Sockeye Fire now 94 percent contained

The Sockeye Fire is now 94 percent contained, with small sections of uncontained perimeter near the Susitna River, Willow Creek and Little Willow Creek. The more than 300 firefighters working the fire are patrolling and completing fire lines.   The scattered rain showers and cooler weather expected for the next several days should help decrease […]

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Sockeye Fire 92 percent contained

The Sockeye Fire is 92 percent contained. Firefighters continue to patrol fire lines and work the remaining portions of the uncontained perimeter along scattered sections of the Susitna River, Willow Creek and Little Willow Creek. More than 200 community members attended an open house last night at the Willow Community Center to learn about some […]

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Sockeye Fire 90 percent contained

Containment of the fire perimeter is 90 percent, while the acres burned have dropped to 7,220 due to better mapping. Pockets of unburned vegetation within the fire perimeter continue smoldering, and isolated flare-ups may occur. Warmer and dryer weather is forecasted for the next two days. Residents might see more smoke as a result. Hot […]

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Sockeye Fire now 79 percent contained

All evacuation and road closures have been lifted for the Sockeye Fire. Willow Creek campground is also re-opened. Law enforcement officials will continue patrolling residential areas. Hot ash pits, falling trees, and health risks associated with smoke remain hazardous to anyone in a burned area. Returning residents are advised to wear gloves, protective clothing and […]

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Sockeye Fire now 53 percent contained

Cooler temperatures and higher humidity have allowed firefighters to complete and secure fire lines along portions of the north, northeast, south and west flanks. Fire containment has jumped to 53%. Re-entry of residents within the fire perimeter is going smoothly. Today crews will continue mop up operations around the remaining fire perimeter. Isolated pockets of […]

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