Fire grows near Anvik

A picture taken from the FAA webcam in Anvik at 1:13 p.m. on June 6, 2017 shows showers south of the village. The Deadmans Slough Fire is burning southwest of Anvik.

A picture taken from the FAA webcam in Anvik at 1:13 p.m. on June 6, 2017 shows spotty showers south of the village. The Deadmans Slough Fire is burning southwest of Anvik.

Activity on the Deadmans Slough Fire burning near Anvik picked up Monday afternoon fueled by wind and continued hot, dry conditions. By the time the fire calmed down overnight, BLM Alaska Fire Service firefighters estimated it had grown by 30 acres to 120 acres. Because the wind picked up out of the northeast at about 3 p.m., the fire mostly moved away from the village of Anvik, which is two miles to the northeast. Winds are expected to shift later today and blow out of the southeast, possibly blowing smoke into the village. Despite this, fire activity is predicted to be calmer with the potential of thunderstorms and rain today.

On Monday, three water-scooping Fire Boss planes, a helicopter, two air retardant tankers and an aircraft coordinating the aviation efforts worked in conjunction with eight smokejumpers on the ground. The Type 1 Chena Interagency Hotshot crew arrived at 9 p.m. to help on the ground. The fire was spotting ahead and leaving pockets of unburned fuel behind. Anvik, which sits near the confluence of the Yukon and Anvik rivers, is surrounded by mostly hardwood trees unlike much of the wooded area the fire burned through yesterday. Spruce trees burn more readily than hardwoods; the latter typically slowing the fire’s spread.

Today, the three Fire Bosses, and a helicopter will continue to help firefighters on the ground gain the upper hand on the fire.

For more information, contact BLM AFS Public Affairs Specialist Beth Ipsen at eipsen@blm.gov or (907)356-5510.

About BLM Alaska Fire Service

The Bureau of Land Management Alaska Fire Service (AFS) located at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, provides wildland fire suppression services for over 244 million acres of Department of the Interior and Native Corporation Lands in Alaska. In addition, AFS has other statewide responsibilities that include: interpretation of fire management policy; oversight of the BLM Alaska Aviation program; fuels management projects; and operating and maintaining advanced communication and computer systems such as the Alaska Lightning Detection System. AFS also maintains a National Incident Support Cache with a $10 million inventory. The Alaska Fire Service provides wildland fire suppression services for America’s “Last Frontier” on an interagency basis with the State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources, USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Military in Alaska.

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