Two new fires burning near Fort Yukon, Livengood

 

Smoke drifts from the Toussaint Island Fire (#244) burning about four miles northwest of Fort Yukon. Photo by Tim Hatfield, BLM AFS

Smoke drifts from the Toussaint Island Fire (#244) burning about four miles northwest of Fort Yukon. Photo by Tim Hatfield, BLM AFS

The BLM AFS Upper Yukon Zone is managing two new fires that cropped up within two hours of each other. People from Fort Yukon may see smoke from the nearby Toussaint Island Fire (#244) while Elliott Highway motorists may see smoke from the Tatalina River Fire (#245) burning 5.2 miles east of Mile 55 Elliott Highway near Livengood.

Four smokejumpers are working on the Toussaint Island Fire, which is burning four miles northwest of Fort Yukon on the island it’s named after. It’s burning along the edge of a slough that connects the Porcupine River with the nearby Yukon River. It was spotted at 12:41 p.m. by a detection flight conducted by the BLM AFS Upper Yukon Management Zone. It was initially reported as a quarter of an acre and burning in white spruce trees. It’s burning in a full protection area on Native corporation land.

Meanwhile, BLM AFS is monitoring the Tatalina River Fire after people reported seeing smoke at about 2:30 p.m. Friday. The fire, which was sized up by BLM AFS personnel as 30-50 acres and 100 percent active, was burning on State of Alaska land in a limited management option area. It was not immediately threatening any structures and allowed to burn in its natural ecological role.

The cause of both fires has yet to be determined.

For more information, contact Public Affairs Specialist Beth Ipsen at (907)356-5510 or at eipsen@blm.gov.

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About BLM Alaska Fire Service

The Bureau of Land Management Alaska Fire Service (AFS) located at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, provides wildland fire suppression services for over 244 million acres of Department of the Interior and Native Corporation Lands in Alaska. In addition, AFS has other statewide responsibilities that include: interpretation of fire management policy; oversight of the BLM Alaska Aviation program; fuels management projects; and operating and maintaining advanced communication and computer systems such as the Alaska Lightning Detection System. AFS also maintains a National Incident Support Cache with a $10 million inventory. The Alaska Fire Service provides wildland fire suppression services for America’s “Last Frontier” on an interagency basis with the State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources, USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Military in Alaska.

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