Firefighters plan to initiate burn operation on Oregon Lakes today

Today, firefighters plan to burn a roughly 3-mile long grassy section along a fire break constructed by the military over the past five years. Burning the grass along this fuel break, about 2 miles north of a military training impact area where the fire is burning, will remove the burnable vegetation in front of the fire. This will significantly reduce the chances the fire will spread north and threaten values at risk. There may be an increase in visible smoke when they ignite the burn, which is planned for midday.

The fire remains in an area that is unsafe for firefighters and low-flying fire suppression aircraft due to the likelihood of unexploded ordinance on the ground. Because of this, the Alaska Interagency has been formulating short- and long-term strategy for the early-season fire while remaining ready to act if the fire came out of the impact area. The Division of Forestry White Mountain Type 2 Initial Attack Fire has also been on standby for several days. With support from aircraft and heavy equipment, this 19-person crew will begin firing operations today if the conditions are right.

The burn operation will provide a buffer to prevent the fire’s movement Graphics box with fire statistics.north, but will not put this early-season fire out.  The fire is not immediately threatening any structures, private property, state timber or military infrastructure.The BLM Alaska Fire Service Military Zone personnel will continue to monitor the fire with regular reconnaissance flights. Should conditions change, the Alaska Team has provided the BLM AFS Military Zone a plan to act to protect the values at risk while considering the safety of firefighters and the public.

The Delta area is fire-prone, with this in mind, the public is encouraged to take steps to minimize the impact of a fire to their property. More information is available through the Delta Area Forestry Prevention office at (907)895-4225 or Firewise online information.

Forecasted weather:  A high pressure ridge will build over eastern Alaska today, starting a warming and drying trend into next week. Temperatures could push into the low 60s with relative humidity levels in the mid- to upper-teens. Southerly winds will range from 5-14 mph with gusts up to 25 mph in the morning. There is no rain in the expected in the first half of the week for the Delta area. 

Photo taken from the air looking east along the fuel breaks toward the Delta River shows where the Winter Road, shear blade line constructed by the U.S. Army over the past three years, and what is referred to as the Lester Line, meet on the Donnelly Training Area west of the Delta River.

This photo taken from the air looking east along the fuel breaks toward the Delta River shows where the Winter Road, a shear blade line constructed by the U.S. Army over the past five years, and what is referred to as the Lester Line, meet on the Donnelly Training Area west of the Delta River. Firefighters plan on burning a section of this area to remove burnable grass and reduce the chances the fire will spread north and threaten values at risk. Photo by Branden Kobayashi/Isaiah Fischer, BLM AFS

About BLM Alaska Fire Service

The Bureau of Land Management Alaska Fire Service (AFS) located at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, provides wildland fire suppression services for over 244 million acres of Department of the Interior and Native Corporation Lands in Alaska. In addition, AFS has other statewide responsibilities that include: interpretation of fire management policy; oversight of the BLM Alaska Aviation program; fuels management projects; and operating and maintaining advanced communication and computer systems such as the Alaska Lightning Detection System. AFS also maintains a National Incident Support Cache with a $10 million inventory. The Alaska Fire Service provides wildland fire suppression services for America’s “Last Frontier” on an interagency basis with the State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources, USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Military in Alaska.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: