Wildland fire update for Monday, June 8

1:00 p.m. – Sporadic rain and cooler temperatures over the weekend continue to moderate fire danger over much of the state, including southwest Alaska where two large tundra fires have been burning for the past week.
The 14,827-acre Whitefish Lake 1 Fire about six miles south of Kalskag is now 100 percent contained and the plan is to release the two remaining crews on the fire today.
Work is also winding down on the 25,260-acre Bogus Creek Fire, which is about eight miles south of the Whitefish Lake 1 Fire. The Gannett Glacier Type 2 Initial Attack Crew is scheduled to be released later today and the two remaining crews on the fire, the Pioneer Peak Interagency Hotshot Crew and Chena Type 2IA Crew, will continue to patrol and mop up the perimeter of the fire. On Sunday, the Chena crew conducted a burn-out operation between two fingers of fire on the southeast corner of the fire with support from a water-scooping CL-415 aircraft while the Pioneer Peak and Gannett Glacier crews worked a finger on the northern perimeter. The tentative plan is to remove all personnel from the fireline on Tuesday.
Both the Whitefish Lake 1 and Bogus Creek fires were started by lightning on May 31 and burned primarily in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge. No structures or Native allotments were burned in either fire and there were no injuries reported.

A Temporary Flight Restriction has been put in place over the Bogus Creek Fire and the Whitefish Lake 1 Fire. For more information on temporary flight restrictions go to http://tfr.faa.gov/tfr2/list.html.
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The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

The Bogus Creek Fire burns Sunday, June 7, 2015, in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Alaska. The 25,260-acre fire was started by lightning on May 31st. Matt Snyder/Alaska Division of Forestry

There are currently only two other fires being staffed in Alaska and they too, are winding down due to rain and continuing suppression efforts by firefighters.
The 249-acre Innoko River Fire burning east of Grayling received one-quarter of an inch of rain overnight Saturday, which aided personnel in securing protection of a Native allotment and mopping up 100 feet inside the fire perimeter. The 15 personnel remaining on the fire will extend mop up operations 200 feet inside the perimeter today and begin to prepare for demobilization on Wednesday. The size of the fire decreased from 350 acres as a result of more accurate mapping. The fire was caused by lightning on June 3.
The 2,902-acre Seventymile Fire near Eagle also received rain on Sunday, as well as hail and lightning. Demobilization for the 31 personnel remaining on that fire, which includes the Midnight Sun Interagency Hotshot Crew, is planned for Wednesday. That fire was started by lighting on May 24.
Only two new fires were reported on Sunday. State forestry firefighters in the Copper River Basin discovered an abandoned campfire in Sailor’s Pit along the Gulkana River and extinguished the Sailor’s Catch Fire before it escaped.
State forestry firefighters in Fairbanks, meanwhile, responded to a report of a tow truck and the surrounding wildlands on fire on Melan Drive South near 15 Mile Chena Hot Springs Road. Four forestry engines and a helicopter responded but upon arrival the helitack found minimal wildland involvement and canceled three engines. The one engine that did respond found a one-tenth of an acre fire smoldering in mixed fuels. The Melan Fire was contained, controlled and put in monitor status.
Though rain has tempered the fire danger in much of Southcentral and Southwest Alaska, there still are vulnerable areas in other parts of the state, particularly the eastern Interior. Red Flag Warnings are in effect today and tomorrow in the Copper River Basin and Tanana Valley due to high winds. There are currently burn suspensions in effect for the Copper River Basin, Tok, Salcha and the Railbelt Area. For information on current burn restrictions go to http://forestry.alaska.gov/burn/index.cfm?fuseaction=permits.doShowChooseFirearea

About Alaska Division of Forestry

Alaska Division of Forestry website: http://forestry.alaska.gov/ Mission: The Alaska Division of Forestry proudly serves Alaskans through forest management and wildland fire protection. The Wildland Fire and Aviation Program provides safe, cost-effective and efficient fire protection services and related fire and aviation management activities to protect human life and values on State, private and municipal lands. The wildland fire program cooperates with other wildland fire agencies on a statewide, interagency basis.

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