Lightning Ignites 11 Wildfires in Denali National Park

DENALI PARK, Alaska: Several thunderstorms moving through the area this past week have ignited 11 wildfires in Denali National and Preserve. Four fires were discovered on June 25. 

The Bear Creek Fire, at 3,596 acres, is regularly being monitored due to its proximity to the Kantishna area. National Park Service (NPS) aircraft flew the fire on June 25 and the crew reported that most of the activity was on the northeast portion of the fire. The unnamed fire ¼ mile west of the Bear Creek fire has merged with the Bear Creek fire. Seventy-five percent of the perimeter was active with isolated torching and spotting to the north. The fire is between Moose Creek and Caribou Creek and remains 4.9 miles due north of the Kantishna Airstrip.

The Iron Fire was last mapped on June 22 at 3,012.9 acres. On June 25 detection aircraft reported the fire had received precipitation. There are no sensitive resources currently, or in the near future, at risk. The fire has been placed in monitor status.

The McLoed Fire, at 171.8 acres on June 22, was smoldering, creeping with isolated torching. There are no sensitive resources currently, or in the near future, at risk. The fire has been placed in monitor status.

The Foraker River Fire received moderate precipitation on June 22 and the majority of the active perimeter is smoldering. The only active flame was some isolated torching on the north and south flank. There are no sensitive resources currently, or in the near future, at risk. The fire has been placed in monitor status and is currently 999.9 acres.

The Herron Fire is 632.9 acres and in monitor status as of June 22. Fire behavior is mostly creeping and smoldering, but isolated and group torching was also occurring. The fire is burning in black spruce, grass and brush. There are no sensitive resources currently, or in the near future, at risk.
The Castle Rock Fire was initially detected through remote satellite imagery (MODIS). NPS aircraft attempted to fly the fire on June 24 but due to thunderstorms in the area the crew was unable to fly over the fire. Observations from Castle Rocks determined the fire was running with isolated torching and estimated to be 200 to 300 acres in size. There are no sensitive resources currently, or in the near future, at risk. The fire has been placed in monitor status.

The Bear Paw Fire, 15 miles northeast of Kantishna in the Kantishna Hills, was initially detected through remote satellite imagery (MODIS). NPS aircraft flew the fire on June 25 and the crew indicated the fire was 30 acres, burning in alpine tundra. Fire behavior was smoldering and creeping and the fire was 30 percent active. There are no sensitive resources currently, or in the near future, at risk. The fire has been placed in monitor status.

The Moose Creek Fire (also currently known as the Bearpaw River Fire), 22 miles north of Kantishna, was initially detected through remote satellite imagery (MODIS). NPS aircraft flew the fire on June 25 and crew indicated that the fire was 339 acres, burning black spruce and hardwoods. The fire has been placed in monitor status.

The Chilchukabena Fire, 21 miles northwest of Kantishna, was initially detected through remote satellite imagery (MODIS). NPS aircraft flew the fire on June 25 and the crew indicated that the fire was 485 acres, burning in black spruce and tundra. Fire behavior was backing to the southwest, growing to the northeast with group tree torching; the fire was 80 percent active. There are no sensitive resources currently, or in the near future, at risk. The fire has been placed in monitor status.
The Carlson Lake Fire, 36 miles northwest of Kantishna and six miles southeast of Lake Minchumina, was initially detected through remote satellite imagery (MODIS). Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Alaska Fire Service aircraft flew the fire on June 25 and the crew estimated the fire at 3,000 acres. It is burning in black spruce, experiencing rapid fire growth and is 100 percent active.

Fire danger for the park and surrounding area is currently extreme due to the higher than normal temperatures, winds, and very dry vegetation and other natural fuels. NPS officials are urging park visitors to be extremely cautious with anything that could start a wildfire. Open fire restrictions remain in place in the park. Fireworks are prohibited. Everyone has a hand in a safe wildfire season.

There are currently 321 active wildfires in the state; so far this year 599 fires have burned more than 920,000 acres in Alaska. Where there is fire, there is smoke. Due to the current and expected statewide fire activity, anticipate the possibility of varying levels of smoke. Keep informed of local fire information and air quality reports. Wildfire smoke information is available at http://dec.alaska.gov/air/smokemain.htm. Visit http://fire.ak.blm.gov for statewide information and a map of the active fires.

For statewide wildfire information, visit akfireinfo.com. Additional park information is available at nps.gov/dena or by calling 907-683-9532 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Stay connected with “DenaliNPS” on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and iTunes – links to these social media sites are available at nps.gov/dena/connect.

Information on current Denali Wildfires is also available on Inciweb – http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4345/#.

About Alaska National Park Service

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: